The Dawn and the Downs

"It seems to be what we feared most. The signs have since begun to show themselves. Slowly at first, as they so usually do. Their prominence gradually growing from the dark, as if shadows forming through the absence of light."

The story of S. Dunstan is clouded in occult. After having moved to a quiet, suburban town in the South East of England, Dunstan finds themself plagued by signs, sites and symbols, all pointing to the Devil's recent presence. Through the recurrence of graffiti sites surrounding their home, the discovery of a local folktale is reignited though its devilish content. Left compelled to follow traces left by breadcrumbs of mythology, Dunstan finds themself lost and shrouded in a personal journey, itself blurred by fiction, fact and folklore. 

 

 

 

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"I have since visited the local library and read all I could on our suspicions. Though initially committed to folklore and local legend, it appears He indeed bares a history to this place. Not least of the construction of several monuments that lay outside the boundaries of Brighton & Hove - effectively cradling my home in His influence. It appears that Sussex was the last county in England to be fully converted to Christianity, and as such was a target for His interest. 

As the story goes, He rose feverish out of heck, digging into ‘Devil’s Dyke’ and making his way out towards the sea, with intent to flood the county and rid it of its recent rise in Christian community. In His ferocity he dug and dug, eventually stubbing his toe on a large rock that he, in blind anger, kicked into the night, landing in our fair Hove. But in His digging He woke an old woman, who in turn woke a rooster causing it to crow. Now, frightened of the dawn and scrambling in heat, He threw and scattered the last clods of earth throughout Sussex, forming the sites of Chanctonbury & Cissbury Ring, Mount Caburn and Rackham Hill."

 

 

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